Welcome to the AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler! Please read The Newbie Guide To Absolute Write

editing for authors ad

A publisher or agency using Google ads to solicit your novel probably isn't anyone you want to write for.


Go Back   Absolute Write Water Cooler > Writing Genre > Interstitial
Register FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-16-2012, 05:11 AM   #1
IkhlasHussain
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
IkhlasHussain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44
IkhlasHussain is on a distinguished road
Don't know my genre

So I've recently completed a novel, but I'm not quite sure what specific genre it falls under. I'm going to be submitting it to agents/publishers soon, and want to ensure I target the right people...

My story is a modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice and Emma, in that it features a plot that revolves around marriage and match-making. But instead, it takes place in modern-day Canada, and features a 22-year old protagonist who only believes in arranged marriages. There is a love story, but it isn't the focal point of the story.

Is there a sub-category for something like this? I don't think so, but I just want to confirm.

Thanks.
IkhlasHussain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 08:54 PM   #2
The Otter
Friendly Neighborhood Mustelidae
 
The Otter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: In the room next to the noisy ice machine, for all eternity.
Posts: 947
The Otter is a glorious beacon of lightThe Otter is a glorious beacon of lightThe Otter is a glorious beacon of light
Possibly, it could be women's fiction. Otherwise, just contemporary fiction (though I don't know if that's an actual label). I'd send it out to agents who rep mainstream or commercial.
The Otter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2012, 11:06 PM   #3
IkhlasHussain
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
IkhlasHussain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44
IkhlasHussain is on a distinguished road
Thanks so much! That's what I was leaning towards, so it's good to get a confirmation.
__________________
"Everything's a story. You are a story. I am a story." A Little Princess, Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Whimsical Whims of Ikhlas Hussain
Facebook
Twitter
IkhlasHussain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2012, 01:18 AM   #4
victoriakmartin
practical experience, FTW
 
victoriakmartin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 275
victoriakmartin is on a distinguished road
Yeah, from how you describe it I would definitely lean towards women's lit.

It sounds like an interesting book too. I've recently fallen in love with a web-series that is a modern retelling of P&P so something like that is right up my alley
__________________
~Imagination and Creation are my MAGIC~

http://www.victoriakmartin.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Victoria-K-Martin/100339113495839

(formerly known as i_paint_the_sky)
victoriakmartin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2012, 01:51 AM   #5
IkhlasHussain
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
IkhlasHussain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44
IkhlasHussain is on a distinguished road
Let me guess....The Lizzie Bennet Diaries? Hehehe, I'm pretty sure that's what you're talking about!

I actually started writing this story before the show came out, but the more I watch it, the more I want to incorporate the original story into my own!

And thanks for the answer, btw.
__________________
"Everything's a story. You are a story. I am a story." A Little Princess, Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Whimsical Whims of Ikhlas Hussain
Facebook
Twitter
IkhlasHussain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2012, 06:03 AM   #6
victoriakmartin
practical experience, FTW
 
victoriakmartin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 275
victoriakmartin is on a distinguished road
That's the one! I'm continually amazed by how well the story can translate into a modern setting. And I know the same is true for Emma, since Clueless worked quite well.
__________________
~Imagination and Creation are my MAGIC~

http://www.victoriakmartin.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Victoria-K-Martin/100339113495839

(formerly known as i_paint_the_sky)
victoriakmartin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2012, 12:40 PM   #7
IkhlasHussain
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
IkhlasHussain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44
IkhlasHussain is on a distinguished road
Yes, things haven't changed that much at all, in terms of how we relate to people and relationships. And I loved Clueless! I hope they make a modern Emma movie soon
__________________
"Everything's a story. You are a story. I am a story." A Little Princess, Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Whimsical Whims of Ikhlas Hussain
Facebook
Twitter
IkhlasHussain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 05:24 AM   #8
names
figuring it all out
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 67
names is on a distinguished road
Sometime writing accross genre boundaries can be pretty tricky. You can really need to understand more than a genre from what I can tell. There are books on any genre. Make sure to look up your own genre.

In my opinion you should try your hand at short story markets since those will spread your name and can be put at the back of the book summary, that name is the biggest seller since it will attract people to actually look at your credentials or so I that is my plan for whenever I do write a novel.
names is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 06:56 AM   #9
Stacia Kane
Girl Detective
AW Moderator
 
Stacia Kane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: In cahoots with the other boo-birds
Posts: 7,996
Stacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Quote:
Originally Posted by names View Post
Sometime writing accross genre boundaries can be pretty tricky. You can really need to understand more than a genre from what I can tell. There are books on any genre. Make sure to look up your own genre.
Or you could, y'know, read books IN your genre, not just about it.


Quote:
In my opinion you should try your hand at short story markets since those will spread your name and can be put at the back of the book summary, that name is the biggest seller since it will attract people to actually look at your credentials or so I that is my plan for whenever I do write a novel.
Names, I don't mean to be rude here, but can you explain to me what exactly the quoted portion above has to do with the OP's question, or the discussion in this thread? Or where you got the idea that short story sales are put in some sort of "back of the book summary?" Or what "name" you mean when you say "that name is the biggest seller?"

The only credentials you need when querying agents is your book. If it's good, it will get read.
__________________
http://www.staciakane.com



WRONG WAYS DOWN available now!


"...in Wrong Ways Down, Kane masterfully peels back layers unseen through Chess' point of view. Through Terrible's eyes, Kane walks readers on a thin line, riding the rough and yet poetic cadence of how he speaks and thinks--and in doing so, she reveals a layer to him, Chess and the underbelly of his world not seen before."

--Lauren Dane, NYT & USA TODAY bestseller
Stacia Kane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 07:34 AM   #10
names
figuring it all out
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 67
names is on a distinguished road
I undertand your point and some genres cannot be taught just by reading books of the genre, some books like dark horizons (on dystopia) give you powerful hints. I have read Ursula le guin's book, and without that book I would be clueless even having understood all about social dystopia. I once tried a cross genre story and it did not work out since I did not study the genre well enough. Plus I read once that such works are ambitious in undertaking, which should help to understand how this relates to the opening post. I have tried cross genre and I know each genre has it's own rules and conventions, it is just that when you try something like dystopia you probably won't get a story that is plotted well enough as far as I can tell (or character centered enough to be considered a good plot) . Dark Horizons is an excellent book, and I've subsequently tried less cross genre after a experimental work. Instead I specialize in science ficton. I don't second guess unless I look look up a little if I want to try something ambitious. Sure what I said works for me, I just want to use my strategies. There are good reference books out there and i have a collection of them at home including another on listing all the types of dystopias. I know a little bit about fantasy and dont dabble into it. Plus some writers supposedly dont write science fiction since it does not work for them or it is not their strong suit. For example a friend of mine tried a science fiction story, is published in fantasy and is not well known. When he tried his science fiction story I knew by reading it wasn't very good (his novel). But I always tried to give the person some feedback. He said it was an experiment and wouldn't write another sci-fi story again until a good while. Mind you he isn't bad at least to me in writing fantasy. I do like the novel he wrote on fantasy even though he hasn't talked too much about it and he is working on a sequel. In my opinion you need to be a good writer in a genre.

I agree on your second point. Plus I know you have your own explanations and can make good points. I can agree with you. Not many people did what I did when I thought I knew how to write in that genre but then I resorted to reading the books in the market. I think cross genre is tricky at least, as if any genre that is unclassfiable but I know that genres need to at least be read on (criticism). I know I accidently confused people but this is my point's support.

Some background is that my friend reads story theory and I know there are a lot of myths concerning that but it works for me.

Some of my background is I read a lot on theory and criticism, and use reference books in my library (the ones I consider good enough to use).

Last edited by names; 11-23-2012 at 08:05 AM.
names is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 05:11 PM   #11
Stacia Kane
Girl Detective
AW Moderator
 
Stacia Kane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: In cahoots with the other boo-birds
Posts: 7,996
Stacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Quote:
Originally Posted by names View Post
I undertand your point and some genres cannot be taught just by reading books of the genre, some books like dark horizons (on dystopia) give you powerful hints. I have read Ursula le guin's book, and without that book I would be clueless even having understood all about social dystopia.
Yes, it's fine to read nonfiction about a genre, but it is really not a substitute for reading fiction.



Quote:
I once tried a cross genre story and it did not work out since I did not study the genre well enough. Plus I read once that such works are ambitious in undertaking, which should help to understand how this relates to the opening post.

Sorry, it doesn't. ALL books are ambitious in the undertaking. And I'm still not sure how dystopia/science fiction relates to the OP's contemporary P&P retelling.



Quote:
I have tried cross genre and I know each genre has it's own rules and conventions, it is just that when you try something like dystopia you probably won't get a story that is plotted well enough as far as I can tell (or character centered enough to be considered a good plot) .

I dunno. I don't have much of a problem with the plots in my dystopian books, and people seem to think they're character-centered enough. I know a lot of other writers who write dystopians who don't have trouble with those elements either. And again, plotting and character are not issues that only affect dystopian novels. They're important in every work of fiction.



Quote:
Dark Horizons is an excellent book, and I've subsequently tried less cross genre after a experimental work. Instead I specialize in science ficton. I don't second guess unless I look look up a little if I want to try something ambitious. Sure what I said works for me, I just want to use my strategies. There are good reference books out there and i have a collection of them at home including another on listing all the types of dystopias.
Dark Horizons does seem to be an excellent book (I have never read it). But I urge you not to rely solely on it, or on any reference book, when it comes to writing fiction. You must read fiction. Read fiction in the genre in which you're writing. Read fiction outside the genre in which you're writing. Reading only reference books about the genre, without any fiction, and then trying to write in the genre is like trying to make yourself understood in a foreign language which you've never heard spoken.



Quote:
I know a little bit about fantasy and dont dabble into it. Plus some writers supposedly dont write science fiction since it does not work for them or it is not their strong suit.
And some do. And some don't write literary fiction, or romance, or humor, or mystery, or horror, because it doesn't work for them or isn't their strong suit. We write what we're best at.


Quote:
In my opinion you need to be a good writer in a genre.

I think we can all agree on that. Good writing is essential. Good writing includes being clear and concise and making oneself understood by readers.



Quote:
I agree on your second point. Plus I know you have your own explanations and can make good points. I can agree with you.
But my second point was a few questions, which I was hoping you would answer. (Unless you're taking the part about the only "credentials" you need being good writing?) What are my own explanations?

I'm honestly not trying to argue with you or make you feel attacked. I really hope you don't feel that way. I am genuinely trying to understand you.



Quote:
Not many people did what I did when I thought I knew how to write in that genre but then I resorted to reading the books in the market.

But that's exactly my point. Reading books in the genre is not something you resort to. It's the first thing you do. It's the most important thing you do. Without reading fiction in the genre you cannot possibly know how to write it well.



Quote:
I think cross genre is tricky at least, as if any genre that is unclassfiable but I know that genres need to at least be read on (criticism). I know I accidently confused people but this is my point's support.

And I disagree. I do not think it's necessary or even very important to read non-fiction about a genre or criticism of the genre. It can be helpful, sure, but it's not at all necessary.


Quote:
Some background is that my friend reads story theory and I know there are a lot of myths concerning that but it works for me.

Your friend reads story theory and that helps your writing?


Quote:
Some of my background is I read a lot on theory and criticism, and use reference books in my library (the ones I consider good enough to use).

I'm sure you read lots of theory and criticism, and if that works for you that's wonderful, but I still cannot agree at all that that's enough to write good fiction, or that it's more important than reading fiction. Literary criticism by its nature is an adjunct to reading fiction; it may help one parse and understand the fiction one has read, but it is not a substitute any more than having read a review of a movie without ever having seen one is enough research to write your own movie.
__________________
http://www.staciakane.com



WRONG WAYS DOWN available now!


"...in Wrong Ways Down, Kane masterfully peels back layers unseen through Chess' point of view. Through Terrible's eyes, Kane walks readers on a thin line, riding the rough and yet poetic cadence of how he speaks and thinks--and in doing so, she reveals a layer to him, Chess and the underbelly of his world not seen before."

--Lauren Dane, NYT & USA TODAY bestseller
Stacia Kane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 06:14 PM   #12
IkhlasHussain
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
IkhlasHussain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44
IkhlasHussain is on a distinguished road
Thanks names and Stacia Kane for your opinions about this, but I have to say, I agree with Stacia Kane. Reading non-fiction can also be helpful, but it's important to read fiction, since it's hard to be taught, just through reading non-fiction, how to tell a story. Reading fiction definitely helps with this.

And yes, previous publication on short stories or articles can definitely help a new author, but I too don't think it's necessary before publishing fiction.

Personally, I think my story falls into women's fiction or mainstream fiction, as per the suggestions of other people in this thread, so I don't think it's THAT difficult to classify. But then again I'm sure I'll find that out when I start sending it out!

Again, I appreciate both of your point of views. Thanks so much for taking the time to respond.
__________________
"Everything's a story. You are a story. I am a story." A Little Princess, Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Whimsical Whims of Ikhlas Hussain
Facebook
Twitter
IkhlasHussain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 09:34 PM   #13
gingerwoman
Frozen as snow.
 
gingerwoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,612
gingerwoman is a glorious beacon of lightgingerwoman is a glorious beacon of lightgingerwoman is a glorious beacon of light
Quote:
Originally Posted by IkhlasHussain View Post
Thanks names and Stacia Kane for your opinions about this, but I have to say, I agree with Stacia Kane. Reading non-fiction can also be helpful, but it's important to read fiction, since it's hard to be taught, just through reading non-fiction, how to tell a story. Reading fiction definitely helps with this.

And yes, previous publication on short stories or articles can definitely help a new author, but I too don't think it's necessary before publishing fiction.

Personally, I think my story falls into women's fiction or mainstream fiction, as per the suggestions of other people in this thread, so I don't think it's THAT difficult to classify. But then again I'm sure I'll find that out when I start sending it out!

Again, I appreciate both of your point of views. Thanks so much for taking the time to respond.
I think your story sounds very much like it would come under the banner of women's fiction and I think their are a lot of agents you could potentially pitch it too. I do wonder...if it's a retelling of Pride and Prejudice then why isn't it a romance? If it was a romance there would be even more options for places to sell it.
As far as the conversation between names and Stacey goes. I love reading writing craft books. I can waste time reading too many writing craft books probably when it would be more beneficial to be attacking my fiction tbr pile or my latest WIP. Craft books excite me like Christmas presents. Don't ask me why.
__________________
Hot Menage - Erotic Romance Read Blurb and Excerpt by clicking here -Amazon Buy Link from Samhain Publishing 4th place for Best Published Paranormal in the Passionate Plume award.




To find actively acquiring publishers and agents visit my blog
http://lisawhitefern.wordpress.com/
gingerwoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 09:43 PM   #14
IkhlasHussain
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
IkhlasHussain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44
IkhlasHussain is on a distinguished road
Great point, Gingerwoman, about why it's not romance. I think the fault here lies in my badly garbled description.

There are elements of Pride and Prejudice and Emma in my story, but it isn't just a romance, and instead deals with what it's like to grow up as a Muslim in the West, and issues of religion and culture.

Thus, I'm not entirely sure if it would fit into women's fiction either, since it's got some broad themes...

Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerwoman View Post
I think your story sounds very much like it would come under the banner of women's fiction and I think their are a lot of agents you could potentially pitch it too. I do wonder...if it's a retelling of Pride and Prejudice then why isn't it a romance? If it was a romance there would be even more options for places to sell it.
As far as the conversation between names and Stacey goes. I love reading writing craft books. I can waste time reading too many writing craft books probably when it would be more beneficial to be attacking my fiction tbr pile or my latest WIP. Craft books excite me like Christmas presents. Don't ask me why.
__________________
"Everything's a story. You are a story. I am a story." A Little Princess, Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Whimsical Whims of Ikhlas Hussain
Facebook
Twitter
IkhlasHussain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2012, 04:41 AM   #15
gingerwoman
Frozen as snow.
 
gingerwoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,612
gingerwoman is a glorious beacon of lightgingerwoman is a glorious beacon of lightgingerwoman is a glorious beacon of light
Quote:
Originally Posted by IkhlasHussain View Post
Great point, Gingerwoman, about why it's not romance. I think the fault here lies in my badly garbled description.

There are elements of Pride and Prejudice and Emma in my story, but it isn't just a romance, and instead deals with what it's like to grow up as a Muslim in the West, and issues of religion and culture.

Thus, I'm not entirely sure if it would fit into women's fiction either, since it's got some broad themes...
Well Jodi Picoult has broad themes.
As long as the main character is a woman you can be lumped into that sexist category, but marketing wise that's good for you. You can call it "Upmarket Women's Fiction" that might be suitable for book group reads and that is something a lot of agents/editors are actually looking for. If you read Donald Maass's latest book he says books that combine the best elements of literary and genre fiction are now breaking out.
I think there could be interest in that topic too.
__________________
Hot Menage - Erotic Romance Read Blurb and Excerpt by clicking here -Amazon Buy Link from Samhain Publishing 4th place for Best Published Paranormal in the Passionate Plume award.




To find actively acquiring publishers and agents visit my blog
http://lisawhitefern.wordpress.com/
gingerwoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2012, 06:04 AM   #16
IkhlasHussain
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
IkhlasHussain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44
IkhlasHussain is on a distinguished road
Hmm, that's interesting. I've never heard of 'upmarket women's fiction; I'm interested to learn more about that.

And I am definitely noticing a mix between literary/genre fiction; that just might be what my MS is a combination of.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerwoman View Post
Well Jodi Picoult has broad themes.
As long as the main character is a woman you can be lumped into that sexist category, but marketing wise that's good for you. You can call it "Upmarket Women's Fiction" that might be suitable for book group reads and that is something a lot of agents/editors are actually looking for. If you read Donald Maass's latest book he says books that combine the best elements of literary and genre fiction are now breaking out.
I think there could be interest in that topic too.
__________________
"Everything's a story. You are a story. I am a story." A Little Princess, Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Whimsical Whims of Ikhlas Hussain
Facebook
Twitter
IkhlasHussain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2012, 09:28 AM   #17
The Otter
Friendly Neighborhood Mustelidae
 
The Otter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: In the room next to the noisy ice machine, for all eternity.
Posts: 947
The Otter is a glorious beacon of lightThe Otter is a glorious beacon of lightThe Otter is a glorious beacon of light
Quote:
Originally Posted by IkhlasHussain View Post
Hmm, that's interesting. I've never heard of 'upmarket women's fiction; I'm interested to learn more about that.

And I am definitely noticing a mix between literary/genre fiction; that just might be what my MS is a combination of.
"Upmarket" is like book club fiction, as I understand it. The sort of thing that might make it onto Oprah's list. It implies a more literary angle, or an exploration of important social themes, or something along those lines. It's one of those things that can be difficult to define, though, as far as whether something is "upmarket" or not.

There's nothing wrong with mixing literary and commercial/genre fiction. I've seen agents' guidelines specifically say that they're looking for stuff that's right on the borderline.

While it's often more difficult to market stuff that straddles the lines between genres, it can make your book more original and compelling, too. Some people invent new genres. "Paranormal romance" was not really a thing before the Anita Blake series. Not saying LKH single-handedly invented it, but it seemed to become much more popular after that.
The Otter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2012, 04:50 PM   #18
Stacia Kane
Girl Detective
AW Moderator
 
Stacia Kane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: In cahoots with the other boo-birds
Posts: 7,996
Stacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsStacia Kane is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerwoman View Post
As far as the conversation between names and Stacey goes. I love reading writing craft books. I can waste time reading too many writing craft books probably when it would be more beneficial to be attacking my fiction tbr pile or my latest WIP. Craft books excite me like Christmas presents. Don't ask me why.

I love craft books. They can be wonderful and they can teach one quite a bit. But one must still read the types of books one is attempting to write. Otherwise the information in the craft books is like attempting to create a meal from an ingredient list with no measurements or cooking instructions for a recipe one has never eaten, seen, or cooked before.
__________________
http://www.staciakane.com



WRONG WAYS DOWN available now!


"...in Wrong Ways Down, Kane masterfully peels back layers unseen through Chess' point of view. Through Terrible's eyes, Kane walks readers on a thin line, riding the rough and yet poetic cadence of how he speaks and thinks--and in doing so, she reveals a layer to him, Chess and the underbelly of his world not seen before."

--Lauren Dane, NYT & USA TODAY bestseller
Stacia Kane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2012, 05:27 PM   #19
KellyAssauer
The Anti-Magdalene
 
KellyAssauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Introvert Convention
Posts: 36,537
KellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsKellyAssauer is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Quote:
Originally Posted by IkhlasHussain View Post
And I am definitely noticing a mix between literary/genre fiction; that just might be what my MS is a combination of.
If you follow the link in my signature called "What genre is my writing" there's an entire list (post 40) of what sort of fiction falls under what sort of label.

This list is an attempt to answer the category question so that an author can find the right publisher to pitch the work. It might not be a perfect list, but it's a start. Comments and updates are welcome. =)
__________________
What Genre is my writing?
Literary & Misfit Writers Group
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duchessmary View Post
Wtf. Happens every time I come in here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver King View Post
For Kelly, and others seeking soft asylum.
"It is only the large subjects and the big, sweeping themes that make cheap sentences possible." -Cleo Birdwell

Tears are peanut & helplessness.
KellyAssauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 02:08 AM   #20
gingerwoman
Frozen as snow.
 
gingerwoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,612
gingerwoman is a glorious beacon of lightgingerwoman is a glorious beacon of lightgingerwoman is a glorious beacon of light
Quote:
Originally Posted by IkhlasHussain View Post
Thanks names and Stacia Kane for your opinions about this, but I have to say, I agree with Stacia Kane. Reading non-fiction can also be helpful, but it's important to read fiction, since it's hard to be taught, just through reading non-fiction, how to tell a story. Reading fiction definitely helps with this.

And yes, previous publication on short stories or articles can definitely help a new author, but I too don't think it's necessary before publishing fiction.

Personally, I think my story falls into women's fiction or mainstream fiction, as per the suggestions of other people in this thread, so I don't think it's THAT difficult to classify. But then again I'm sure I'll find that out when I start sending it out!

Again, I appreciate both of your point of views. Thanks so much for taking the time to respond.
Probably the only benefit to having previous publications like short stories when you submit your novel is so you don't feel embarrassed when writing your cover letter.
The agent or editor would only care about how good this story is and track record of novel sales if you've written a previous novel.
__________________
Hot Menage - Erotic Romance Read Blurb and Excerpt by clicking here -Amazon Buy Link from Samhain Publishing 4th place for Best Published Paranormal in the Passionate Plume award.




To find actively acquiring publishers and agents visit my blog
http://lisawhitefern.wordpress.com/
gingerwoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Custom Search

If this site is helpful to you,
Please consider a voluntary subscription to defray ongoing expenses.

Buy Scrivener 2 for Mac OS X (Regular Licence)


All times are GMT +4.5. The time now is 05:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.