Read Books By AWers!

Welcome to the AbsoluteWrite Water Cooler! Please read The Newbie Guide To Absolute Write

editing for authors ad

A publisher or agency using Google ads to solicit your novel probably isn't anyone you want to write for.


Go Back   Absolute Write Water Cooler > Publishing > Ask the Editor
Register FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-27-2006, 10:21 PM   #26
brainstorm77
practical experience, FTW
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 14,316
brainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Do writers need to submit through a agent to Bethany House?
brainstorm77 is offline  
Old 09-27-2006, 11:37 PM   #27
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by brainstorm77
Do writers need to submit through an agent to Bethany House?
I'm lifting this directly from our writers' guidelines posted on our Web site.

Bethany House Publishers is no longer able to accept unsolicited manuscripts, proposals or queries by mail, telephone or e-mail. We will consider one-page only queries sent by fax to 952-996-1304 and directed to the appropriate department (Fiction, Nonfiction, or Youth). Queries of interest to us should receive a reply within four to six weeks. (Note: Query tips are at the bottom of these guidelines.)

We continue to accept queries, proposals and manuscripts through established literary agents, recognized manuscript services, and writers conferences attended by Bethany House editorial staff.

You can find out more at www.bethanyhouse.com

And I think if you read this forum page closely, you'll discover there are other ways to submit, too.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-27-2006, 11:47 PM   #28
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by brainstorm77
What things about a manuscript are likely to grab your attention when it comes across your desk? Also what are the current trends you have noticed in Christian fiction?
I look very closely at the first paragraph, even the first line. Did it hook me? Then the first chapter Ė is anything interesting happening? Can I picture the characters and setting? Do I want to keep reading?

I love original, clever ideas. Good writing and storytelling, of course, impress me because, Iíll be honest with you, most of what I read in proposals is subpar. Iím looking for a manuscript that makes me want to stay past five to finish reading. I like a strong narrative voice.

An interesting trend right now is a surge of popularity in certain genres. For the most part, these genres are new or recent to CBA. Those genres are
suspense
humorous romance (both historical and contemporary)
chick lit and mom lit
literary fiction
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 12:58 AM   #29
JennaGlatzer
wishes you happiness
 
JennaGlatzer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 9,690
JennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsJennaGlatzer is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Charlene, thank you so much for being here. You're doing a great job fielding our questions, and I know we all appreciate it!

Here's a question that was posted in the wrong spot earlier. I merged it into this thread, but it wound up on page 1, so you probably won't see it:


Historical Fiction Parameter
My WIP is a novel about a black pastor in 1960's MS with themes of intercession, spiritual warfare and racial reconciliation. According to your guidelines this would not be accepted because the time period is after 1950. Is that Bethany's standard or industry wide definition?

David
__________________
I am no longer here. If you'd like to visit me, please find me at www.jennaglatzer.com or on Facebook. Thanks!
JennaGlatzer is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 01:51 AM   #30
brainstorm77
practical experience, FTW
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 14,316
brainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsbrainstorm77 is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpatt
I look very closely at the first paragraph, even the first line. Did it hook me? Then the first chapter Ė is anything interesting happening? Can I picture the characters and setting? Do I want to keep reading?


I love original, clever ideas. Good writing and storytelling, of course, impress me because, Iíll be honest with you, most of what I read in proposals is subpar. Iím looking for a manuscript that makes me want to stay past five to finish reading. I like a strong narrative voice.

An interesting trend right now is a surge of popularity in certain genres. For the most part, these genres are new or recent to CBA. Those genres are
suspense
humorous romance (both historical and contemporary)
chick lit and mom lit
literary fiction
Thanks for answering my questions, very insightful.
brainstorm77 is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 08:10 AM   #31
Bk_30
muse..muse...come here muse!
 
Bk_30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: south of the Mason Dixon line
Posts: 421
Bk_30 is well-respected
I also want to thank you for comming. My question has more to do with your youth market though. In your guildlines it says that you do not accept unsolicited proposals for full-color picture books. This lead me to believe that you do not accept any quiries for picture books, was I wrong? What is the comming trend for christian childrens picture books and early/easy reader books for the christian market?
Bk_30 is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 03:26 PM   #32
Good Word
still crazy after all these years
AW Moderator
 
Good Word's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 3,157
Good Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsGood Word is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Hi Charlene,

We're so glad you are here!

I've been wondering about promotion and PR. What is expected of the author in terms of promotion? What does a publishing company the size of Bethany House sees as its role? Do you have PR staff?

Something else: When someone like you reads as part of your job, do you ever get to read for fun? What was the last book you purchased in a book store or online?

Thanks,

Lisa
__________________

www.wordmountain.com
Good Word is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 06:09 PM   #33
Birol
Around and About
SuperModerator
 
Birol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Where I hang my hat... when I can find my hat.
Posts: 14,739
Birol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsBirol is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Thank you for joining us, Charlene. I was wondering about the publication process post-acceptance. (Yes. I know. Ego. ) What are the so-called normal steps and timeline?
__________________
Facebook

Birol is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 06:18 PM   #34
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by JennaGlatzer
My WIP is a novel about a black pastor in 1960's MS with themes of intercession, spiritual warfare and racial reconciliation. According to your guidelines this would not be accepted because the time period is after 1950. Is that Bethany's standard or industry wide definition?

David
Hi David,

Iím not sure what you mean by "according to your guidelines, this would not be accepted because the time period is after 1950." What made you think that? We classify anything set before 1950 as historical. Anything after 1950 is called contemporary. That is a pretty standard delineation. We publish both categories.

By the way, if you havenít already, I highly recommend reading River Rising by Athol Dickson. Fantastic book. Some similar themes.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 06:27 PM   #35
Roger J Carlson
Moderation in All Things
AW Moderator
 
Roger J Carlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: West Michigan
Posts: 12,643
Roger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Hi Charlene,

Welcome.

At a writer's conference everal years ago, I talked to an editor of a small Christian publisher about Christian Science Fiction. She seemed to think the term was an oxymoron.

My question: do you see any market for Christian Science Fiction (as opposed to Fantasy)?
Roger J Carlson is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 06:34 PM   #36
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bk_30
My question has more to do with your youth market though. In your guildlines it says that you do not accept unsolicited proposals for full-color picture books. This lead me to believe that you do not accept any quiries for picture books, was I wrong? What is the comming trend for christian childrens picture books and early/easy reader books for the christian market?
Iím sorry to say I donít have good news for you about the Christian childrenís book market. Youíre correct, we do not accept queries for picture books. Childrenís picture books are very expensive to produce, but they sell for a relatively low price. Also, most of the childrenís books published in the general market are safe and clean, so youíre competing in a very crowded market.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 06:53 PM   #37
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Good Word
I've been wondering about promotion and PR. What is expected of the author in terms of promotion? What does a publishing company the size of Bethany House sees as its role? Do you have PR staff?

Something else: When someone like you reads as part of your job, do you ever get to read for fun? What was the last book you purchased in a book store or online?
These days an author must wear the hat of marketer as well as author. Gone are the days when the author stays in the attic and writes while the publisher promotes his book. You the author are a key player in your bookís success. We need your help to get the word out, especially in your local area. What exactly is expected of you will vary depending on your publisher and the type of book. At BH, we send out a marketing binder that lists some of the things authors can do to promote their book.
Yep, we have Marketing and Publicity staff. They create and place ads, get reviews, send out press releases and follow up, create marketing materials such as bookmarks or postcards, buy co-ops, help set up signings and other promotional events, submit the bookís information to all the online retailers, etc. We also have a large sales staff that is out calling on book buyers at major sales outlets.

Hee hee, yeah, I do get to read for fun. I love books. I read what our competitors are publishing in fiction. I read novels selling well in the general market. I read nonfiction when I want something different. My eyes get really tired, so I often listen to books on tape. The last book I purchased was about the history of Yellowstone National Park (yeah, Iím a history buff). The last novel I read that wasnít a Bethany House book was The Curious Incident of the Dog in Nighttime.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 07:03 PM   #38
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Birol
Thank you for joining us, Charlene. I was wondering about the publication process post-acceptance. (Yes. I know. Ego. ) What are the so-called normal steps and timeline?
Think positive! Hereís a quick overview of How a Manuscript Becomes a Book. Most anything besides a novel would have additional steps. The timeline varies by publisher, but the process usually takes 10 to 18 months. Right now we are signing books that will release in Summer 2008 or later.
  1. Author delivers manuscript to publisher.
  2. Reviews read manuscript and editor provides feedback to author.
  3. Author addresses feedback in a revision/rewrite and sends new manuscript.
  4. Editor line edits manuscript, creates a style sheet, and writes cover copy.
  5. Manuscript is copy edited.
  6. Book interior is designed. Manuscript is typeset.
  7. Typeset galleys are proofread.
  8. Galleys are sent to the author for review.
  9. Galleys are sent back to typesetting and corrections are entered.
  10. Cover design is finalized (a cover mockup has already been created for the catalog).
  11. Editor checks final galleys. (Another proofread is sometimes done at this time.)
  12. Electronic files are sent to the printer.
  13. Printer sends page proofs and cover proof for the publisherís approval
  14. Book is printed, bound, and shipped to the publisherís warehouse.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 07:11 PM   #39
veinglory
volitare nequeo
AW Moderator
 
veinglory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: right here
Posts: 26,259
veinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsveinglory is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Hi there! I have a general sort of question. A lot of writers seem to think the author should be doing masses of promotion. However the only publishers who really push this idea seem to be the ones whose sales are terrible (making me think it is largely a blame shifting tactic). I would be interested in knowing what you think is an appropriate amount of promotional activity for a new author with their first book coming out--and what sorts of author-initiated promotional activity are actually effective (or ill-advised).
__________________
veinglory is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 07:13 PM   #40
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger J Carlson

My question: do you see any market for Christian Science Fiction (as opposed to Fantasy)?
Hi Roger,
Yes, I would say there is a market for Christian science fiction. Itís a very small market right now, but weíre noticing that young people, especially, are interested in this genre. For some examples of whatís been done, check out the books by John B. Olson and Randall Ingermanson and Kathy Tyers.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 07:27 PM   #41
Stef
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Wink Get Ready

Hi, Charlene! Thank you for answering our questions. Does Bethany House have a statement of faith for their authors to sign?

Blogs are everywhere these days. Do you recommend that your authors use them as a promotional tool? Have you ever really discovered an author through a blog?

Is it more difficult for BH to have first novels reviewed?

Do you put awards clauses (like the Christy) in contracts? For example, "If this book is nominated for or wins an award, royalties will increase by X%".

My parents always said I asked too many questions. Thanks for your time.
 
Old 09-28-2006, 07:28 PM   #42
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by veinglory
Hi there! I have a general sort of question. A lot of writers seem to think the author should be doing masses of promotion. However the only publishers who really push this idea seem to be the ones whose sales are terrible (making me think it is largely a blame shifting tactic). I would be interested in knowing what you think is an appropriate amount of promotional activity for a new author with their first book coming out--and what sorts of author-initiated promotional activity are actually effective (or ill-advised).
Iíve never seen the promotion work an author does negatively impact the sales of the book. When the author is more involved, the sales are usually higher. Sure, 100 copies might not make a huge difference in the bottom line, but thatís 100 people who might never have found the book otherwise, who might tell their friends, and who might buy the authorís next book. An author is especially effective in his/her own local area: making media contacts, making bookstore and library contacts, promoting the "local author" angle. We give authors several ideas (ranging from speaking engagements to sending out postcards) and encourage them to do whatever they are comfortable with, without impeding the main thing they can do that we canít, which is to write the books.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 07:52 PM   #43
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stef
Hi, Charlene! Thank you for answering our questions. Does Bethany House have a statement of faith for their authors to sign?

Blogs are everywhere these days. Do you recommend that your authors use them as a promotional tool? Have you ever really discovered an author through a blog?

Is it more difficult for BH to have first novels reviewed?

Do you put awards clauses (like the Christy) in contracts? For example, "If this book is nominated for or wins an award, royalties will increase by X%".

Hi Stef, Good questions. We do not have authors sign a statement of faith, but we do usually ask them about their faith background. They are out there representing our company, so we want to make sure our views mesh.


I donít have a specific recommendation about blogs. Iíve seen authors use them successfully as a promotional tool. I do encourage authors to at least have a website that features information about them and their books.


I wouldnít say itís any more difficult to get a first novel reviewed than a novel by an established author. In fact, it may be easier because review sources like to feature the "fresh, new thing." What sometimes makes a book hard to get reviewed is the long lead time those publications need or the small amount of space devoted to Christian books.


Oh no, we donít put in any award clauses. Iím sorry to say that the books that win awards are hardly ever the high selling books. The recognition is very, very nice, but literary awards do not usually lead to higher sales.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 08:25 PM   #44
maestrowork
Fear the Death Ray
 
maestrowork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: wgasa
Posts: 43,748
maestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsmaestrowork is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
Hi Charlene, thanks for being here. I have a question about distribution -- how does Bethany House work with their distributors to get the books out there, or do you have your own sales force? And do all your authors' books get on the shelves, and if not, how are they made available to the buying public?

Thanks,
Ray
__________________

I didn't want to work. It was as simple as that. I distrusted work, disliked it. I thought it was a very bad thing that the human race had unfortunately invented for itself.
-- Agatha Christie





The Pacific Between ē A Bunch of Stories
(2006 IPPY Award)

WIP: Beyond the Banyan Tree - draft 9, 125,000 words

Home Page | Blog | Reviews
maestrowork is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 09:39 PM   #45
cpatt
New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 34
cpatt is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by maestrowork
Hi Charlene, thanks for being here. I have a question about distribution -- how does Bethany House work with their distributors to get the books out there, or do you have your own sales force? And do all your authors' books get on the shelves, and if not, how are they made available to the buying public?
Thanks,
Ray
Hi Ray,
At Bethany House, we have a sales force that takes our frontlist and contacts every outlet you can think of, from independents to chains to libraries to distributors to special markets. Yep, every book we publish ends up on a shelf somewhere. We donít have total control over what goes where (there are book buyers at the stores and distributors who make those decisions based on what they think they can sell), but we can tell you where itís likely to be. You can find our books online, in Christian bookstores, in the inspirational section at chains like Borders and Barnes & Noble, and at stores like Wal-Mart and Costco.
cpatt is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 09:59 PM   #46
Roger J Carlson
Moderation in All Things
AW Moderator
 
Roger J Carlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: West Michigan
Posts: 12,643
Roger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate complimentsRoger J Carlson is so great that we've run out of appropriate compliments
At the same writer's conference I mentioned before, the publisher said that the market is much more open to "edgier" fiction. Perhaps including some profanity, violence, and sexual content. Are you seeing a trend toward this?
Roger J Carlson is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 10:11 PM   #47
AmyBA
I'm a believer
 
AmyBA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Back in the saddle again.
Posts: 897
AmyBA has earned our admirationAmyBA has earned our admirationAmyBA has earned our admirationAmyBA has earned our admiration
Hi Charlene-- thanks for coming by to answer our questions. Mine's a short one, I think:

How much of your day is spent reading submissions? How often do you end up taking work home with you?
__________________
AmyBA is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 10:37 PM   #48
Robin Bayne
~writes for Him~
 
Robin Bayne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: ~the old line state~
Posts: 1,836
Robin Bayne has earned our admirationRobin Bayne has earned our admirationRobin Bayne has earned our admirationRobin Bayne has earned our admiration
How would you describe the writer you'd most like to work with?
__________________



Robin Bayne is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 10:42 PM   #49
karenmary
practical experience, FTW
 
karenmary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 127
karenmary is on a distinguished road
Hi Charlene. What a gift you are giving to the AW writers. Thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpatt
One thing some first-time authors donít do that I absolutely need them to do is finish the manuscript. What I care about first and foremost is if you can write a good story - and keep it going for 350 pages. I also like to see authors get several critiques by trustworthy people on the manuscript so they are giving me their best possible product.
Do you know if your non-fiction acquisitions editor feels the same way about a finished manuscript? I've read/heard/gotten the idea from somewhere that it is best NOT to finish a non-fiction book manuscript b/c of the vast amount of research that might go into an effort that isn't exactly right for a publisher -- and could be slanted to fit their needs specifically is accepted.

Karen Mary Lynch
__________________

www.karenmlynch.com
karenmary is offline  
Old 09-28-2006, 11:12 PM   #50
akaa1a
Giggle Collector
 
akaa1a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Somewhere between today and tomorrow
Posts: 332
akaa1a has earned our admirationakaa1a has earned our admirationakaa1a has earned our admirationakaa1a has earned our admiration
Good afternoon, Charlene!


Obviously books like the Christmas Box and A Prairie Christmas have been popular, but is the narrowness of the subject make it difficult for a first-time novelist who has written holiday Christian fiction to be considered for pupblication?

And, if you don't mind another question, is a charitable slant for a novel unwise for the Christian marketplace?

Many thanks for your time!
akaa1a is offline  
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Custom Search

If this site is helpful to you,
Please consider a voluntary subscription to defray ongoing expenses.

Buy Scrivener 2 for Mac OS X (Regular Licence)


All times are GMT +4.5. The time now is 03:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.